Subscribe for our newsletter to have the latest stories and curated art recommendations delivered straight to your inbox

TOPICS & ARCHIVES
ART 101

The Colorful History of Purple

The Colorful History of Purple
blogger name

RTISTIQ TEAM

Like ImageLike
Comment Imagecomments
Fav image SAVE

Purple. One of the most dynamic and impressive colors in the visible light spectrum, it continues to exude power and prestige. In many cultures, this hue has been used to identify a monarch. And that connection continues to the present day.

Combining the cool presence of blue with the robust charisma of red, purple is one of the most enigmatic colors. It seems electric at times, at other times serene. It merges the strengths of both cool and warm colors, standing as an entity unto itself.

To understand why purple has such a pull on us, we need to understand its long history — social, political, and artistic.

The Early History of Making Purplerait of Empress Catherine the Great of Russia (circa 1780) by Fyodor Rokotov

Part of the appeal and mystique of this color throughout the past few millennia has been the extreme difficulty we’ve had producing it. The first millennia BC saw one purple pigment emerge, but it came at a high price. (While manganese was used in the neolithic to make purple, it would not be common again until the modern era.)

While today you can purchase purple paint for a few dollars at any craft store, it used to be an expensive and daunting task. One of the first ways we created it was through the murex shellfish. This creature could be used to produce a pigment called purpura, also known as Tyrian purple 

But hundreds of thousands of murex were required to make even a small amount, limiting its use to the richest and most powerful people in society. One famous lover of Tyrian purple was none other than Julius Caesar. And he got a taste for it while visiting Cleopatra’s palace.

Caesar wasn’t satisfied with having a lot of purple, he made it illegal for anyone else to wear it. Nero would later become even more committed, making it a capital offense, meaning death for anyone who dared to wear the great leader’s favorite color.

While Rome eventually fell, the status it gave purple survived. For European kings, this was the color to show your regal status. Even the Catholic Church used purple for the robes of bishops.

But as it so often does, technology eventually came in to democratize access to purple. But while the economics of the color changed, it nevertheless continued its hold on the imagination.

Purple for the Masses

undefined

The Artist’sGarden at Giverny (1900) by Claude Monet

It was the precocious William Henry Perkiin who created the first synthetic purple pigment in 1856 — he was only a teenager at the time.

While working with coal tar as a potential cure for malaria, he couldn’t help but notice the purple patina the material gave his instruments.

What once was a color reserved for the elite of society could be created with this inexpensive base.

Soon after this pigment was discovered — creating what the inventor called mauve — a new generation of artists were seeking to capture natural light on their canvases. Called the Impressionists, this group fell in love with purple, and for the first time it was relatively easy to acquire it. They used it so much that they were accused of “violettomania” by art critics.

With high demand meeting high supply, purple was everywhere.

As the Impressionists came and went, new waves of artists continued to experiment with purple artworks. Some of the greatest names in 20th century art made extensive use of the color — none other than Mark Rothko, Francis Bacon, and Georgia O’Keeffe make up only a few of the masters transfixed by purple.

Pop art picked up the color as well, finding its exuberance and, at times, tackiness a perfect choice for their works. 

In the 80s, industrial and graphic designers used the color frequently, especially the Memphis school which came to define the look of the era.

Purple Today

undefined

It is interesting to scroll through the visual culture today and see just how much the design of the 80s and 90s is being referenced. Those references often include heavy use of one color: purple.

It seems that purple, more than any color, has left an indelible stamp on us. From its origins as a rare commodity, the exclusive hue of the emperor, to its status as the color du jour of fine art, to its ubiquitous presence in pop culture — purple has kept us captivated.

As we move further into the 21st century, there is no doubt that we will make use of purple, but in what new ways? Only time will tell.

Looking for a purple artworks for your living room? Browse now on RtistiQ a curated collection of artworks that celebrates the meaning of Purple.

SIMILAR ARTICLES

The Amazing Power of Color: How Artists Use Color In Art

The Amazing Power of Color: How Artists Use Color In Art

We3’ve talked about the lasting appeal of black and white photography even discussed great painters who’ve turned to a black and white palette to create masterpieces. Now, it’s time to return to color. Because while there is certainly a place for monochromatic art, there is simply no denying the power of color. It is one of the most important tools in the artist’s toolkit. When we see rich colors in paintings, we have a surge of emotion, physical sensations, and a million little associations we’ve made with the color over our lives come rushing back. Getting Color Right Before learning how to use color in art, getting the color right is an important first step. For much of its history, Western art has tried to achieve realism through color, capturing it on the canvas through ever more advanced techniques. Nevertheless, there were still things artists could do with color to surprise and inform viewers. For instance, Dutch painter Johannes Vermeer (1632 – 1675) subtly used complementary and near-complementary colors to generate visualinterest (see above). And many, many artists would reach for certain colors for their symbolic meaning. Still, color was mostly limited to parodying real life. It wasn’t until the 19th century that things began to get more exciting for color. Monet Paints Light Study of a Figure Outdoors: Woman with a Parasol, facing left (1886) by Claude Monet Led by the likes of Claude Monet (1840 – 1926), the Impressionists tried to grasp how things actually looked in the moment. Monet in particular was fascinated by the way that time of day radically changed the true colors he was seeing. Monet was onto something, we now know that the visual cortex in the brain is capable of rapidly adjusting to light conditions, despite the actual color signals coming into the eye. He also used color theory extensively, making sure to bring complimentary colors together — pairs like purple and yellow, red and green, blue and orange. These colors set off each other, making both more intense. Still, this was all realistic in a sense. It was done to bring about a more human reality into painting. It would take a new wave of artists to go one step further. Matisse and Escaping Color Realism Woman with a Hat (1905) by Henri Matisse Henri Matisse (1869 – 1954) was an unparalleled forward thinker in art. Along with Picasso, he completely upended tradition’s centuries-long stranglehold on Western art. His experimental use of color is, to this day, his most long lasting achievement. He helped form Fauvism, a movement that broke the convention of using color realistically. Instead, he went for bright, bold colors — using them to create visual interest and aesthetic beauty, rather than strictly mimic reality. Fauvism only lasted a little over a decade, but the implications were enormous. They would go on to shake the foundations of the art world and help usher in modern art. Abstraction and Color No. 61(Rust and Blue) (1953) by Mark Rothko : Copyright Mark Rothko Fauvism pushed artists to be more creative and freer on their canvases than ever before, and later movements would use this new impulse to their full advantage. Abstract art moves away from representation entirely. In the early 20th century, artists began to experiment with this style. Some made less representational paintings of real objects, while others went off to paint entirely abstract compositions. And many cared deeply about color. Painters like Wassily Kandinsky (1866 – 1944) even worked through the spiritual importance of color, embedding his works with emotionally poignant hues. By the mid-century, Abstract Expressionists like Mark Rothko (Orange & Yellow Mark Rothko) (1903 – 1970) got rid of any pretense of a scene, building extremely simple compositions out of blocks of color. While controversial even to this day, his work studied the essence and character of colors, and examined how the simplest of contexts can change the underlying feeling. Since the Abstract Expressionists, contemporary art has gone on to continue where they left off. We are still seeing new approaches, new ideas, and new relationships between the artist and their palette. The history of art can never be understood without grasping that most fundamental of elements: color. Passionate about colors? Discover our curated art collection related to colors below. 1. Purple & Wine Artworks 2. Orange& Yellow Artworks Artworks exploring Cold Colors 3. Artworks exploring Cold Colors

History of Oil Paintings

History of Oil Paintings

Oil paintings have existed for centuries, from the cave paintings of Bamiyan along the Silk Road to American post-war art. There have been several studies related to the origins of oil as a painting medium with some believing that the technique was first developed in the 11th century, while Giorgio Vasari has credited 15th century Flemish painter Jan van Eyck with the “invention” of oil paints in his famous treatise The Lives of the Artists. However, a discovery in 2008 led to the evidence that oil painting existed as early as 650 CE (7th century CE), when anonymous artists used oil that may have been extracted from walnuts or poppies to decorate the caves in Bamiyan, Afghanistan. The practice of easel painting with oil colours started post-1400 CE, to meet the changing requirements of Renaissance artists who were looking for some other medium than pure egg-yolk tempera. The depth and richness of colour in oil paint is unmatched and it’s slow drying time allows artists to manipulate the medium over an extended period giving the artists the flexibility in blending and layering - thin glazes to dense thick impasto, as well as a wide range of tonal transitions and shades producing both opaque and transparent effects, as well as matt and gloss finishes. Considered a hallmark of the Old Masters, particularly during the Northern Renaissance, oil paint was one of the most preferred mediums for Leonardo da Vinci, Rembrandt, and iconic modernists like Vincent Van Gogh, Pablo Picasso, Wassily Kandinsky and many others. Although there are several remarkable oil paintings by famous artists to study this medium, we have narrowed down the exhaustive list to 10 iconic works. The Arnolfini Portrait by Jan van Eyck Jan van Eyck’s Arnolfini Portrait (1434) remains one of the most visually intriguing paintings of all time. With all of its details and intricacies, the exquisitely rendered work appears to be a straightforward depiction of a wealthy merchant and his wife. However, on a closer look several mysteries emerge along with Van Eyck’s masterful technique which continue to enthrall viewers till today! (Image courtesy: Wikimedia Commons) Mona Lisa by Leonardo da Vinci Mona Lisa (c. 1503-1519), the painting of a mysterious woman with an enigmatic smile, remains one of the most famous paintings in the world. The sitter is believed to be Lisa Gherardini, the wife of Florence merchant Francesco del Giocondo. The painting is known to be the earliest Italian portrait to focus so closely on the sitter in a half-length portrait. (Image courtesy: Wikimedia Commons) The Rape of Europa by Titian The Rape of Europa (c. 1559-1562), tells the mythological story of the abduction of Europa by the king of gods, Jupiter, disguised as a white bull. An example of Titian’s late style, the painting’s refined poignancy lies in his use of colour, vividity, luminous tints, brushwork and subtlety of tone. The oil painting continues to have a profound influence on Western art. (Image courtesy: Wikimedia Commons) Girl with a Pearl Earring by Johannes Vermeer Sometimes nicknamed the “Mona Lisa of the North”, Girl With a Pearl Earring (1665), is brilliant in its simplicity. The girl, wearing a blue and gold turban and an oversized pearl earring is the entire focus with only a dark backdrop behind her. Interestingly, this masterpiece isn't even a portrait, but a “tronie” - a Dutch word for a painting of an imaginary figure with exaggerated features. (Image courtesy: Wikimedia Commons) Le déjeuner sur l'herbe (or The Luncheon on the Grass) by Édouard Manet Manet's masterpiece, Le Déjeuner sur l'herbe (1863), featuring a nude woman picnicking in the company of fully-clothed men, draws inspiration from classical paintings of female nudes. Up until The Luncheon on the Grass, female nudes were represented figures from mythology or allegory. By placing an anonymous unclothed woman in a contemporary everyday setting, Manet bridged the gap between the Realist and Impressionist art movements with its modern approach to style and subject matter. (Image courtesy: Wikimedia Commons) The Starry Night by Vincent Van Gogh Few artists are as renowned for their use of color as Vincent van Gogh. His The Starry Night (1889) full of striking blues and yellows, and the dreamy, swirling atmosphere have intrigued art lovers for decades. The painting was created late into the Dutch painter's short career and depicts the view from his window in the asylum at Saint-Rémy-de-Provence. (Image courtesy: Van Gogh Gallery) The Old Guitarist by Pablo Picasso Painted at the height of Picasso’s Blue Period, The Old Guitarist (1903) depicts a feeble blind old man hugging his guitar. Picasso painted it after his close friend and Spanish poet Carles Casagemas commited suicide. The melancholic state was used by design to haunt onlookers in a way that would make them question why the working class and high-class individuals continued to prosper while those that needed the most help continued to languish in poverty. (Image courtesy: Wikimedia Commons) The Persistence of Memory by Salvador Dali Salvador Dali’s most iconic work, The Persistence of Memory (1931) was painted at the height of the Surrealist art movement. It displays an outlandish subject matter evocative of a dreamscape, which is why it is believed that Dalí was probably hallucinating when he painted the piece. Dalí would attempt to enter a state of self-induced psychotic hallucinations to create what he called “hand-painted dream photographs.” (Image courtesy: Museum of Modern Art, New York) The Kiss by Gustav Klimt Austrian Symbolist painter Gustav Klimt was famous for his dazzling use of gold to give a shimmering effect to his paintings and his masterpiece The Kiss (1907-1908) is no different. Made in the Vienna Secession art movement, this intimate portrait captures a tender moment between a pair of lovers. (Image courtesy: Google Art Project) Nighthawks by Edward Hopper The highly evocative American masterpiece Nighthawks (1942) is a stark depiction of loneliness, alienation and the breakdown of city life, epitomizing somber emotions of a period in history riddled with world wars and the great depression. The oil painting is said to have influenced the look and feel of many Hollywood films including Ridley Scott’s futuristic neo-noir Blade Runner (1982). (Image courtesy: Wikimedia Commons) Oil paintings are one of the best investments you can make for your home or business. Discover oil paintings for sale on RtistiQ, A Virtual Art Marketplace For Art Lovers And Artists.

The History of Pink: from Pompadour Rose to Millennial Pink

The History of Pink: from Pompadour Rose to Millennial Pink

Believe it or not, Millennial pink is a color. Still hard to pinpoint the exact shade of pink, it is sometimes described as "dusty pink", "quartz pink" or "peach pink". Clear thing is that it has become the statement color of a generation. Since being announced as PANTONE color of the year in 2016, this pastel color has grown to become one of the most loved shades in fashion, design, or art. If for Gen Z (Millennials) pink is hip, strong, and androgynous, if you think about but the recent appropriation by feminists around the world as a powerful, socio-political mark, through the “pussyhats”, this pastel color has a long history of shifts in cultural significance and symbolistic. Pompadour Rose In the West, pink first became fashionable in the mid 18th century, when European aristocrats, men and women equally, wore powdery color garments as a symbol of luxury and social class. Madame de Pompadour, the official mistress of Louis XV, loved the color so much that, in 1757, French porcelain manufacturer Sèvres had to create a line of porcelain decorated with an exquisite new shade of pink and named it after her, Rose Pompadour. A Sèvres 'Rose Pompadour'-ground vase and stand circa 1758 Madame de Pompadour (1759) by François Boucher Mass-produced Pink For the following century, Pink continued to be worn by both men and women, as well by children regardless of gender. The meaning of pink took a turn inl the mid 19th century when the feminization of pink begun. Pink became an expression of delicacy at the same time with men in the Western world transitioning towards wearing mostly dark, sober colors. At around the same time, Pink developed the first erotic connotation, suggesting the color of flushed skin. Lingerie in shades of pink became increasingly common. The industrial revolution making the mass-produced goods widely available meant a shift from sophistication to vulgar. Pink went from luxury to working-class. As seen in the interior depicted by post-impressionist artists at the beginning of teh 20th century, the color pink was well adopted by the mainstream. A pink corset from the 1880s credit: FIT Museum La Chambre Rose (The Pink Bedroom) 1910, Edouard Vuillard The Pink Studio During the 20th century pink’s cultural significance underwent further shifts, especially in art. Its exotic appearance made it a perfect choice for Matisse and other fauvists who were refusing to accept that color must reflect the real world, as seen in his painting The Pink Studio which in reality had no pink walls. The Pink Studio (1911), Henri Matisse Gentlemen Prefer Blondes in Pink In the male-dominated world of Dadaists, Surrealism and American Abstract Expressionism, pink was of no interest for artists. The same attitude towards this color was reflected by the wider society. By the 1950s, pink had become more gender-coded than ever, thanks to postwar advertising, especially in America. Pink was used as a symbol of hyper-femininity and gender-based roles in society, creating the stereotype: "pink for girls, blue for boys". Merlyn Monroe, the embodiment of the the 1950s idea of femininity, soft-spoken, erotic but short-lived, as a flower, is often remembered for her pink gown from the movie Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953). Pink goes Pop By the 1960s, pink was flourishing within pop culture. The dresses were pink, the bathrooms were bubblegum pink. Even the most tragic event of the decade, the assassination of JFK, had a touch of pink. On that day the first lady Jackie Kennedy, a fashion icon, was wearing a raspberry pink suit designed by Chanel. As a translation of mainstream culture into high art, pink found its way back into art through Pop Art. Through the art of Andy Warhol, David Hockney and even minimalist artists, such as Dan Flavin pink resurged in art during the 60s’. Pinkout of a Corner (1963), Dan Flavin MarilynMonroe (1967), Andy Warhol Pink with a Punk Attitude Over the past decades, the degree of association between femininity and pink has both grown and shrunk. In the ’80s the gender identification through color was made from birth, in the ‘90s and early 2000s, toy-store aisles that featured toys for girls became exclusively pink. But a the same time, pink was reclaimed by gay rights activists since the ‘70s. Furthermore, since the rise to the cultural dominance of girl bands (Spice Girls) and female punk-rock leading figures (Gwen Stefani’s fuchsia pink hair) in the ’90s and 2000s, pink has been reclaimed as a symbol of feminine power and strength. Restaurant designed in 2014 by India Mahdavi Pink and the Millennials Once a color statement for all things feminine, pink is now widely accepted as an almost gender-neutral color, due to the popularity of Millennial Pink, a dusty, subtle shade, which became ubiquitous in the 2010s. Used in fashion, design, architecture, and art, it became the go-to color for a generation willing to accept differences and embrace weaknesses. The Millenials that grew up with social media and instantaneous exchange of information are whilling to openly speak about formally considered taboo subjects, such as mental health or gender identity. Their approch to life is softer, as a toned-down shade of pink. Their addoption of pink (Millennial Pink) came as a reaction against the stereotypes associated with pink. View from Wes Anderson’s cult movie The Grand Hotel Budapest (2014) Having said all this, let’s not forget that the meaning of any color is a cultural construct, it’s the society that is giving meaning to colors. As the years will pass by, the meaning of Pink might shift again and again. If I got your attention and we sparked your interest in Pink, check our curated collection of contemporary art: Millennial Pink and Other Pastels. Author: Floarea Baenziger

ARTICLES ON ART 101

Art Deco Styles: An Iconic Fusion of Elegance and Modernity

ART 101

Art Deco Styles: An Iconic Fusion of Elegance and Modernity

Art Deco is a prominent design style that emerged in the 1920s and flourished until the outbreak of World War II. Characterized by its luxurious materials, geometric forms, and streamlined aesthetic, Art Deco became a symbol of glamour and sophistication during the interwar period. This design movement impacted various visual arts, architecture, fashion, and interior design aspects. This article will delve into the captivating world of Art Deco styles, exploring its origins, key characteristics, influential artists and architects, and its lasting legacy. Origins and Influences Art Deco drew inspiration from various sources, blending elements from different cultures, historical periods, and artistic movements. The style's name derives from the 1925 Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes held in Paris, where it was first showcased. However, its roots can be traced back to the early 20th century, influenced by the avant-garde art movements of the time, such as Cubism and Fauvism. One of the significant influences on Art Deco was the discovery of King Tutankhamun's tomb in 1922, which sparked a craze for Egyptian motifs and symbolism. This fascination with ancient Egypt led to incorporation of pyramids, sphinxes, hieroglyphics, and other Egyptian-inspired motifs into Art Deco designs. Additionally, the style's streamlined forms and angular geometry were influenced by the emerging field of industrial design and the aesthetic of machines. Key Characteristics Art Deco is characterized by distinct visual features that make it instantly recognizable. Here are some key characteristics of Art Deco styles: Geometric Shapes: Art Deco embraces geometric shapes, such as zigzags, chevrons, triangles, and stepped forms. These shapes are often used to create dynamic, visually striking compositions. Streamlined Silhouettes: Inspired by the sleek lines of modern technology and transportation, Art Deco features streamlined, aerodynamic silhouettes. These can be seen in the period's buildings, furniture, and even fashion designs. Luxurious Materials: Art Deco celebrates luxury and opulence, employing exotic woods, marble, chrome, glass, and precious metals like gold and silver. These lavish materials contribute to the overall sense of elegance associated with the style. Decorative Elements: Art Deco designs often incorporate elaborate decorative elements, such as sunbursts, stylized floral motifs, and geometric patterns. These decorative details add a touch of sophistication to the overall composition. Bold Colors: Art Deco embraces bold, contrasting colour schemes. Vivid hues like royal blue, emerald green, ruby red, and vibrant yellow are frequently used to create a visually striking impact. Sunburst Motifs: The sunburst motif, symbolizing energy and optimism, is a recurring theme in Art Deco designs. It is often represented as a radiating pattern of geometric lines or a stylized sun. Influential Artists and Architects Numerous artists and architects played significant roles in shaping and popularizing Art Deco styles. Here are a few key figures: Tamara de Lempicka: A prominent Art Deco painter, de Lempicka's works epitomize the style's elegance and glamour. Her portraits often featured fashionable, confident women in luxurious settings. Émile-Jacques Ruhlmann: Ruhlmann was a renowned French furniture designer who created exquisite Art Deco pieces. His furniture designs combined luxurious materials with precise craftsmanship and sleek silhouettes. Erté: A Russian-born artist and designer, Erté was renowned for his extravagant fashion illustrations and costume designs. His work showcased the epitome of Art Deco elegance and sophistication. Raymond Hood: An influential architect, Hood's designs include the iconic Rockefeller Center in New York City. He incorporated Art Deco elements into the skyscraper's design, contributing to the style's popularity in the United States. Clarice Cliff: A British ceramic artist, Cliff revolutionized the pottery industry with her bold and colourful Art Deco designs. Her pottery pieces featured geometric patterns and vibrant glazes. Legacy and Modern Interpretations Although the heyday of Art Deco was in the early 20th century, its influence and appeal continue to resonate in modern design. Art Deco elements can be found in contemporary architecture, interior design, and fashion. In architecture, buildings like the Chrysler Building in New York City and the Napier Municipal Theatre in New Zealand exemplify the enduring impact of Art Deco. These structures continue to captivate audiences with their sleek lines, decorative details, and innovative use of materials. In interior design, Art Deco-inspired furniture and decor remain highly sought after. The style's emphasis on luxury and glamour translates well into modern homes, with its sleek lines and geometric patterns adding a touch of sophistication to any space. Art Deco influences can be seen in the designs of many contemporary fashion houses. The use of bold colours, geometric patterns, and luxurious materials harkens back to the elegance and allure of the Art Deco era. Conclusion Art Deco styles represent a fascinating fusion of elegance and modernity. Emerging in the 1920s, this design movement embraced geometric shapes, luxurious materials, and bold colours. Its influence extended to various artistic fields, leaving an indelible mark on architecture, interior design, fashion, and more. With its timeless appeal, Art Deco continues to captivate audiences and inspire contemporary design. The legacy of this iconic style serves as a testament to its enduring popularity and artistic significance.

Exploring Pop Art: Definition, Movement, and Notable Artists

ART 101

Exploring Pop Art: Definition, Movement, and Notable Artists

Pop Art emerged as a vibrant and influential artistic movement in the mid-1950s, challenging traditional notions of art and embracing the popular culture of the time. With its bold imagery, vibrant colors, and incorporation of everyday objects, Pop Art brought art closer to the masses. This article explores the definition, key characteristics, notable artists, and lasting impact of Pop Art on the art world and popular culture. What is Pop Art? Pop Art, short for "popular art," was a movement that emerged in the United States and the United Kingdom during the 1950s and 1960s. It was a reaction against the dominant abstract expressionist movement, which focused on subjective, introspective, and non-representational art. Pop Art, on the other hand, celebrated the ordinary, the commercial, and the mundane, drawing inspiration from mass-produced consumer goods, advertising, and popular culture. What are the characteristics of Pop Art? Appropriation and Repetition: Pop Art often incorporated images and objects taken from popular culture, such as product packaging, comic books, and celebrities. Artists manipulated and repeated these images to highlight their significance and challenge the concept of originality. Bold Colors and Simplified Forms: Pop artists used vibrant, eye-catching colors to attract attention and evoke a sense of consumerism. They simplified forms and employed graphic techniques, reminiscent of advertising and comic book aesthetics. Irony and Critique: Pop Art often conveyed a sense of irony and critique by juxtaposing disparate elements, subverting traditional art forms, and challenging societal norms. It questioned the boundaries between high and low culture, art and mass production, and the commercialization of society. Leading Artists of the Pop Art Movement Andy Warhol: One of the most iconic figures associated with Pop Art, Warhol employed screen-printing techniques to reproduce everyday objects, such as Campbell's soup cans and Coca-Cola bottles. His work explored themes of consumerism, fame, and the cult of celebrity. Roy Lichtenstein: Lichtenstein is renowned for his comic book-inspired paintings, featuring bold lines, Ben-Day dots, and speech bubbles. By appropriating and enlarging comic strip panels, he elevated popular culture to the realm of high art. Claes Oldenburg: Oldenburg's sculptures took ordinary objects and transformed them into monumental works of art. His oversized sculptures of hamburgers, typewriters, and clothespins challenged the viewer's perception of scale and materiality. Richard Hamilton: Considered the father of British Pop Art, Hamilton explored the relationship between art and technology. His collage-like works incorporated images from advertising, cinema, and popular magazines, reflecting the media-saturated society. Impact and Legacy Pop Art's influence extends far beyond its initial emergence in the 1960s. Its vibrant and accessible style has had a lasting impact on contemporary art, design, fashion, and popular culture. Pop Art paved the way for subsequent art movements such as Neo-Pop, Street Art, and the appropriation art of the 1980s. It blurred the boundaries between high and low art, challenged the traditional notions of artistic value, and emphasized the democratization of art. Concluding Remarks Pop Art revolutionized the art world by breaking away from the abstract and introspective tendencies of the time. It celebrated the everyday, the commercial, and the popular culture, making art more accessible to a wider audience. Through its use of appropriation, bold colors, and irony, Pop Art continues to captivate and inspire, leaving an indelible mark on contemporary art and popular culture.

Exploring Art Medium: A Fusion of Category and Material in Art Creation

ART 101

Exploring Art Medium: A Fusion of Category and Material in Art Creation

Art is a vast and diverse realm that encompasses a wide range of creative expressions. Within this realm, the concept of "Art Medium" holds a crucial role, serving as the bridge between artistic intent and tangible creation. The medium that an artist chooses to work with can have a significant impact on the style and meaning of the artwork. For example, a painting made with oil paints will have a different look and feel than a painting made with watercolors. In the context of Art attribution "Art Medium" has been used interchangeably to refer both the category of artwork and the materials used to bring forth an artist's vision. This article delves into the multifaceted nature of art medium, exploring its dual significance in the world of art. Art Medium as a Category of Art In its first sense, an art medium represents the various categories or disciplines within the field of art. Each medium possesses distinct characteristics, techniques, and artistic approaches. Let's explore some of the prominent art mediums: Painting: Painting is a traditional and widely recognized medium that employs pigments on surfaces such as canvas, paper, or wood. It encompasses various styles like oil painting, watercolor, acrylics, and mixed media, each offering unique visual qualities and expressive possibilities. Painting, Pop Horizon by Barron Holand Sculpture: Sculpture involves shaping and manipulating materials such as stone, wood, metal, clay, or even found objects. Artists create three-dimensional forms that can range from classical figurative representations to abstract and conceptual installations. Sculpture, S-04 BIG FOOT by Aleks Rosenberg Drawing: Drawing is a fundamental art medium that employs pencils, pens, charcoal, or other tools to create two-dimensional representations. It encompasses techniques like sketching, shading, and hatching, allowing artists to convey ideas, explore compositions, and develop their artistic skills. Drawing, Dancer in Red by NK Hong Photography: Photography born from the marriage of science and art, captures moments through the lens of a camera. It employs light-sensitive materials and digital technologies to immortalize scenes, people, and emotions, providing a unique perspective on the world. Photography, La grève Je T'aime by Gudzovsky Printmaking: Printmaking encompasses various techniques such as etching, lithography, screen printing, and relief printing. Artists create multiple copies of their artworks, each possessing its own subtle variations, by transferring images onto paper or other surfaces. Ceramics: Ceramics involves working with clay, shaping it into objects, and firing them in kilns to achieve hardness and permanence. This ancient medium encompasses functional pottery, decorative vessels, sculptures, and intricate porcelain works. Textiles: Textile art employs fabrics, threads, and fibers to create tactile and visually engaging works. It includes techniques like weaving, embroidery, quilting, and textile installations, exploring themes of culture, identity, and materiality. Installation and Performance Art:: These mediums go beyond traditional forms, embracing immersive experiences and the participation of the audience. Artists use various materials, space, sound, and movement to create site-specific installations or enact performances that challenge the boundaries of art. Digital NFT: Very recently Digital NFT is being regarded as an art medium, and more importantly revolutionising Digital Art representation. Utilizing blockchain technology, NFTs represent unique digital assets, such as artwork, music, or videos, providing a secure and verifiable link between the digital file and ownership rights. Art Medium as Material Used in Art Creation In the alternate context, an art medium refers to the specific materials and tools employed by artists to bring their artistic visions to life. The choice of medium significantly influences the aesthetic outcome and the creative process itself. Artists often use it to describe how they created their artwork, which gives a sense of how it needs to be viewed as well. For e.g. Oil paintings ( referenced as "Oil on Canvas") are best observed from a distance to get a more clearer understanding and the depth of the Art. Again depending on the Category of work there are different materials used to fulfill the Artistic vision of the creator. Here are some examples of art mediums in the context of Material Used Paints: Artists use various types of paints, including oil paints, watercolors, acrylics, and gouache, each with its own characteristics and techniques. These pigments, when combined with binders, allow artists to manipulate color, texture, and opacity on different surfaces. A combination of the paint type and the support used form the Medium used for the artwork, for e.g. Oil on Canvas, Gouache on paper, Acrylic on Linen etc... Drawing Tools: Pencils, pens, charcoal, markers, and pastels are all examples of drawing tools that artists employ. These tools vary in hardness, texture, and line quality, enabling artists to create intricate details or bold, expressive strokes. Sculpting Materials: Sculptors utilize a plethora of materials such as stone, wood, metal, clay, plastic, and even unconventional materials like ice or food. Each material offers its unique qualities, texture, and potential for manipulation. Cameras and Photographic Equipment: With the advent of photography, cameras and photographic equipment became vital art mediums. Film cameras, digital cameras, lenses, lighting equipment, and photo-editing software all contribute to the creation of photographic art. Printmaking Supplies: Printmaking relies on materials like printing plates, inks, brayers, and printing presses. These tools facilitate the transfer of images from the plate to the chosen substrate, resulting in distinct prints with their own visual characteristics. Clay and Kilns: Ceramics artists employ different types of clay, glazes, and firing techniques to shape and fire their creations. The firing process in kilns transforms the raw materials into durable and visually captivating ceramic pieces. Fabrics and Threads: Textile artists utilize a wide range of fabrics, threads, dyes, and surface design techniques to create intricate tapestries, clothing, quilts, or fiber-based sculptures. The choice of fabric and the application of techniques contribute to the overall visual and tactile impact of the artwork. The Importance of Art Medium The medium that an artist chooses to work with can have a significant impact on the style and meaning of the artwork. For example, a painting made with oil paints will have a different look and feel than a painting made with watercolors. The medium can also affect the way that the viewer interacts with the artwork, an example being, a sculpture that is made from metal will feel different to the touch than a sculpture that is made from wood. The art medium is of utmost importance in the representation of art as it influences the aesthetics, technical possibilities, symbolic significance, and cultural context of an artwork. It allows artists to express their vision, engage viewers, and communicate their intended messages effectively. The careful consideration and deliberate selection of the art medium contribute to the overall artistic expression and impact of the artwork.Different art mediums have evolved throughout history and across cultures, reflecting the societal and historical context in which they originated. The selection of a particular medium can evoke associations and references to specific art movements, traditions, or periods. The Future of Art Mediums The art world is constantly evolving, and new art mediums are being developed all the time. For example, digital art is becoming increasingly popular, as artists use computers and other digital tools to create their work. It is impossible to predict what the future holds for art mediums. However, it is likely that new art mediums will continue to be developed, and that artists will continue to experiment with different materials and techniques. It's important to note that the future of art mediums will be shaped by the creativity and experimentation of artists themselves, as they continue to push boundaries, embrace new technologies, and explore innovative approaches to art-making. The possibilities are vast, and the future of art mediums for visual artists holds exciting potential for artistic expression and engagement with audiences. Digital, Augmented and Virtual Realities, Mixed Media, Eco-Friendly Materials, BioArt and Living Materials, all are being explored, included and evolved for Artists to continously push the boundaries of their creative abilities to produce thought provoking artworks. Conclusion In the realm of art, the term "art medium" embraces a dual meaning. It encompasses both the categorization of art forms and the materials employed by artists. The category of art medium reflects the different disciplines and techniques artists employ to create their work, while the material aspect highlights the tangible tools and substances used to manifest their creative visions. Artists' choices of medium significantly influence the visual, tactile, and conceptual qualities of their artworks. Furthermore, contemporary artists often push the boundaries of traditional mediums by exploring hybrid forms and incorporating new technologies. Understanding the significance of art medium enhances our appreciation for the diverse expressions and the innovative approaches artists employ in their creative endeavors.

ALL
For your daily updates on all things Art & Technology, follow us at
@rtistiq_art
Sign up for our newsletter to have the latest stories and curated art recommendations delivered straight to your inbox